Configuration Geographic Data


Kodiak Island, Alaska


Courtesy NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE)
Courtesy: NASA Visible Earth, the Global Wind Speed page


   Wind hindcast maps from NASA above indicate a favorable capacity factor for hydrokinetic and wind hybrid energy conversion modules over a vast region of the Northern Pacific Ocean near Kodiak Island, Alaska. According to NASA Visible Earth Global Wind Speed data, this vast region consistently sustains wind speeds averaging above 12.1m/s or 23.5 kts.

Month: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg. (m/s): 14 14 13 12 11 11 9 10 11 13 14 14

   The Integrated Power Technology Corporation™ proposes deploying a fleet of Turbofoil® equipped vessels configured with a parasail. The parasail exploits high altitude winds of substantial force but lower turbulence in stable conditions. Using an Exponential Wind Gradient Model with a Hellman Exponent conservatively estimated at α=0.12 indicates a wind speed at a height of 300m to be 1.32 times greater than at 30m as shown on the map above to obtain the operating margins modeled in the Turbofoil® Feasibility Spreadsheets below.


Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory paper entitled: Ocean Wind Field Mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar and Its Application to Research and Applied Problems


   The wind hindcast map from Radarsat-1 Synthetic Aperature Radar above exhibits a sporadic phenomenon that favorably affects capacity factor for hydrokinetic and wind hybrid energy conversion modules along the coastal region of the North Pacific near Kodiak Island, Alaska. According to Radarsat-1 Synthetic Aperature Radar wind speed data, frequent gale force Gap Flow and Barrier Jet wind weather systems occur from the coast extending hundreds of kilometers into the ocean. Although a Turbofoil® operator cannot accurately make long term predictions and thus cannot take prior account for these gale force Gap Flow and Barrier Jet wind weather systems due to their sporadic nature, on average they will likely prove to substantially benefit the operator in obtaining profitable operating margins. As these jet wind patterns drift along the coast over the windy season, a Turbofoil® in deeper water attains obvious advantages over fixed farms over relatively shallow water.


Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) and Investment Rate of Return (IRR) of a Turbine-Integrated Hydrofoil or Turbofoil® in the Northern Pacific Ocean


Feasibility of a Turbofoil® in the Northern Pacific Ocean


	 Hogg Island Harbor, North Kodiak Island, Alaska, March 11, 2013
   The following pages report profitablility of a Turbofoil® in the Northern Pacific Ocean during recent wind events as described above, given NOAA data applied to the Exponential Wind Gradient Model as described above.


    Integrated Power Technology Corporation™ has developed the above models to facilitate optimization of design and operational trade-offs of the Turbofoil® and continues to perfect these models and explore other geographic locations for similar development.


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